Oneness

Reposted from The Awakening Website

During World War I, a Vietnamese named Ngo Van Chieu was an administrator for the French in Indo-China. After the war, he founded a philosophy in Tay Ninh province, in Vietnam. This philosophy is called Cao Daism – the belief in the principles of love and justice, the ongoing connection of each religion to its source, and the belief in one God. It is the assertion of Cao Daism that any believer who follows the esoteric practice of their religion will ultimately reach that same God.

Buddhism

30 metre Statue of the Buddha, in Nha Trang, Vietnam

Decades later, during the Vietnam war, a leading teacher of Buddhism, named Jack Kornfield, was focusing on bringing the great Eastern spiritual teachings to the West.  In the introduction to a book, titled Jesus and Buddha: The Parallel Sayings, he wrote a short story of an experience he had during the late 1960s in war-torn Vietnam…

After passing through the waterways in the midst of active gunfire, Kornfield’s boat arrived at a dock in the Mekong Delta. There, Buddhist monks escorted him to an island at the end of which stood their Buddhist monastery. But, as his eyes moved to the top of a nearby hill, he was surprised to see two giant statues standing in embrace, one was of Gautama the Buddha and the other was of Jesus the Christ.[i]

While helicopter gunships flew overhead and the war raged around us, Buddha and Jesus stood there like brothers, expressing compassion and healing for all who would follow in their way. Jack Kornfield

30 m Status of the Christ
in Vung Tao, Vietnam

After the North Vietnamese Communists won the Vietnam war, the Cao Dai religion became heavily persecuted. In 1979, four of its members were executed.

But it continued underground, spreading by way of the people who escaped the war by fleeing to Europe, North America and other parts of the world. It is now the third most popular religion in all of Vietnam, with a membership totalling in the millions.

Founded on religious philosophies from both Eastern and Western cultures, Cao Daism is an attempt to merge universal truths and insights that are common to Hinduism, Judaism, Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, Christianity, Zoro-astrianism and Islam. As a blend of the teachings of all the major world religions, it is seen as the answer to the Universal Faith. 

The Cao Dai believe that history is divided into three significant periods of revelation, the first being when God’s truth was revealed to humanity through the diety Lao Tse; the second being the appearance of dieties, such as Buddha, Mohammed, Confucius, Jesus and Moses.[ii]  The Cao Dai believe that their Universal Faith is now ushering in the third period.  They call this third period Tam Ky Pho Do – one nation under God.

There is One truth, not many. It is open to all. See and know this for yourself. Buddha

Many, many Timelines are now merging and coming together in a way that is presently inconceivable to us.  As they merge, we will start to experience the meaning of Oneness.  This age of Oneness, which will spiritually enLighten the West, is marked by a direct revelation between Heaven and Earth.

This merging and melding of Timelines will continue until there is only One, and then that too will dissolve, disintegrate, disappear…

Video:  http://www.youtube. com/SethAdamSmith

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[i] Jesus and Buddha: The Parallel Sayings, Ulysses Press, 2005
[ii] Vietnam, Nick Ray and Wendy Yanagihara, Lonely Planet; 8th Revised edition, 2005

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